Upcoming Events & Past Recordings

To promote a culture of understanding and inclusiveness, the CALS Diversity & Inclusiveness Committee hosts the Perspectives on Diversity & Inclusion Speaker Series. We have a number of excellent upcoming speaker events you can attend in person or join via webinar, and have hosted many excellent talks in the past that you can view the recordings of below.

Past Recordings

Diversity and Inclusiveness in CALS 101—Maria Marzinsky & Brian Berrellez

This presentation will serve as a brief introduction about diversity and inclusion. The Data Solutions Team will present on quantifiable social dimensions of the CALS community, which includes students, faculty, and staff. The presentation will focus on three aspects.

  1. The current composition of CALS diversity
  2. The projected future composition of CALS diversity
  3. Our composition’s position compared to the University
Addressing Implicit Bias in Health Care—Dr. Jeff Stone

Emerging research indicates that primary care physicians can hold implicit biases (negative attitudes and stereotypes) about African-American patients that negatively impact clinical interactions and treatment recommendations. Dr. Stone’s research examines if the presence of implicit bias in health care extends to other stigmatized patient groups (Hispanics) and providers (nurses), and if the activation of both medically accurate and inaccurate stereotypes about stigmatized patients occurs outside of the provider's conscious awareness. He will also present evidence to suggest that a brief, active learning workshop for medical students on the psychology of implicit bias can be effective for reducing implicit stereotyping of Hispanic patients.

Reframing Disability How What We Think We Know Shapes Our Campus Community—Dr. Amanda Kraus

This presentation will explore prevalent models used to frame disability and discuss how these ideas impact our professional practice. Typically, disability is understood as an individual problem, deficit or tragedy, not a sociopolitical phenomenon created and perpetuated by systemic design. Drawing from Disability Studies, we will problematize messages we receive about disability and discuss how to operationalize new thinking that will ultimately contribute to a more equitable and inclusive experience on campus

Unconscious Bias and Micro-Aggression—Dr. Laura Hunter

Unconscious bias is pervasive, with nearly all people displaying unintended biases toward certain groups.  Micro-aggressions are one consequence of unconscious biases.  After a brief introduction to the research, we will consider strategies for addressing others’ unconscious biases and micro-aggressions and offer teaching and assessment strategies that reduce the impact of our own unconscious biases.

Ready, Set, Gay? Sexual and Gender Minority Prejudice in Collegiate Athletics—Dr. Russ Toomey

Young athletes are engaging in sports in an ever-evolving environment where larger discourses and public opinion polls suggest that attitudes toward sexual and gender minorities (SGM) are becoming more tolerant and affirming. This presentation will explore findings from a recent study of college student athletes’ perceptions of the sports climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender players. Dr. Toomey will present descriptive findings that characterize the climate for SGM players, describe intervention in homonegative or transnegative language or behaviors, and provide recommendations for how to cultivate safer climates for SGM players. While the studies are focused on the collegiate sports context, applications can be drawn to the larger university setting.

Difficult Dialogues in the Classroom—Dr. Jill Williams

Recent research has pointed to the positive effect talking about race- and sex-based discrimination has on young people from marginalized groups.  From fostering motivation to pursue the sciences to improving self-esteem, integrating discussions of racism, sexism, and other forms of oppression into educational contexts has the power to positively impact marginalized students.  In this talk, I will briefly review some of the relevant research on this issue before facilitating a conversation about how we can integrate discussions of discrimination into our everyday teaching practices in a way that fosters inclusive educational environments.  

Beyond Lip Service: Moving from Diversity Work to Equity/Justice Work on College Campuses—Dr. Zachary Ritter

Diversity and Inclusion are words that are thrown about a great deal in higher education as well as other industries. But they mean different things for different folks. How do we go beyond counting how many folks of color, how many women, or how many LGBTQ+ folks we have in our campuses/workplaces, to practicing justice and equity work, where discriminatory policies and procedures are eliminated and positive campus/work climates are created? Utilizing current scholarship, this workshop will illustrate how we can go from “diverse faces” on a brochure or website, to a tangible reimagining of institutional practices and institutional cultures.

Combating Imposter Syndrome in Academia—Dr. Laura Hunter & Dr. Mika Galilee-Belfer

Imposter Syndrome is common among high achievers, and it occurs when people are unable to accept their successes and internalize their accomplishments. They often attribute their accomplishments to luck rather than to ability, and they fear that others will unmask them as a fraud or imposter. This talk will provide an overview of impostor syndrome, common thoughts among those with impostor syndrome, and examples of how impostor syndrome impacts education and careers. There will be opportunities for participants to reflect and identify their own impostor thoughts and how it may be impacting their careers. Strategies will be offered on how to overcome or address impostor thoughts, and participants can share strategies they have found helpful.

Behind the Masc.: Challenging notions of toxic masculinity—Bryant Valencia

This session will provide participants with an introduction to male socialization and masculinity. Participants will have the opportunity to explore and reflect on how their agency is vital in addressing toxic masculinity in their communities.

Creating More Inclusive Environments for Students: Countering Micro-aggressions—Teresa Graham Brett

In this session, we will discuss the concept of microaggressions, how they contribute to a larger campus climate for students, and ways to counter and create a more inclusive environment that supports student success. Participants will explore types, examples, and impacts of microaggressions, as well as resources and support for navigating the environment.

Engaging Native American Students in STEM: Theoretical Framework and the iSTEM Program—Dr. Sally Stevens

Increasing and retaining Native American students’ interest and retention in STEM education is critical to students’ future employment, expanding the STEM workforce, and for bringing diverse perspectives to STEM disciplines. This presentation focuses on using a culturally relevant theoretical framework, Funds of Knowledge (FoK) to guide the iSTEM program; a successful STEM educational program for 3 -8th grade Native American students. An overview of FoK and the iSTEM program will be presented along with lessons learned and the outcomes achieved.

Ask for What You Want—Lydia Kennedy

If you don’t ask, the answer is always no!  Negotiations are opportunities that happen to us every day.  In this session, we’ll look at our view of negotiations and opportunities to be creative in asking for what we want. Learn how to prepare and develop strategies for mapping out your next negotiation.

Professional Empowerment Series Networking & Kickoff Event

The goal of the series is to provide targeted professional development opportunities for non-tenure, non-continuing track faculty, appointed professionals, and staff with an emphasis on topics which are particularly relevant to underrepresented groups.

For this Networking Kick-Off Event we will provide more information on the series, and solicit your feedback about topics that are relevant and interesting to you.

Brought to you by the Office for Diversity & Inclusive ExcellenceCALS Diversity & Inclusiveness CommitteeCALS Staff Council, and CALS Appointed Professional Council

Perspectives on Diversity & Inclusion Speaker Series: Faculty Fellows Program–Caitlin Kerrigan

Established in 1984, the Faculty Fellows consists of 60 exceptional faculty members who bring the feel of a small liberal arts college to a large, Research I university. With backgrounds ranging from Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering to Gender & Women’s Studies, there is one thing that all Faculty Fellows have in common – an unwavering commitment to student success. Each fellow is assigned to one of 44 sites on campus including residence halls, cultural centers, and Arizona Athletics. Spending dedicated time at their site each week provides students with an opportunity to build relationships with faculty outside of the classroom, breaking down traditional barriers and encouraging feelings of mattering and belonging. In this presentation, the Coordinator of Faculty Programs will recruit faculty fellows from across campus to speak about their experiences in the program, how the Fellows program benefits both students and faculty, and next steps for the program and creating a diverse and inclusive campus community.

Brought to you by: the CALS Diversity & Inclusion Council and the Office for Diversity & Inclusive Excellence

Professional Empowerment Workshop Series: Preparing Your "A" Game: Resume/CV Review and Mock-Interviews

The first event of the Professional Empowerment Workshop Series: Preparing Your "A" Game: Resume/CV Review and Mock-Interviews

The goal of the series is to provide targeted professional development opportunities for career track faculty, appointed professionals, and staff with an emphasis on topics which are particularly relevant to underrepresented groups.

Facilitated by Heather Roberts-Wrenn, PHR, SHRM-CP, Assistant Director, Organizational Effectiveness Division of Agriculture, Life and Veterinary Sciences, and Cooperative Extension

For this event participants will bring a printed copy of their current drafted resumes or curriculum vitaes to the workshop with them and will receive feedback and recommendations from experienced reviewers on their documents. They will also have an opportunity to participate in a mock interview with the facilitators and gain insight and feedback on their answers and performance.  We will also provide lunch!

Brought to you by the Office for Diversity & Inclusive Excellence, CALS Diversity & Inclusion Council, CALS Staff Council, CALS Appointed Professional Council, Native Faculty, and Office of Diversity and Inclusion at UAHS

          

Perspectives on Diversity & Inclusion: “If Lil’ Wayne Can Say It, Why Can’t I?”: White Male Undergraduates and Their use of the N-Word – Nolan Cabrera

This talk explores the causes and consequences of White male undergraduates using the n-word during their college years.  Almost all heard and used the n-word in their everyday lives, believed it was not racist, but tended not to say it in the presence of minorities.  Some were uncomfortable hearing the n-word, but they rarely challenged their friends. The discussion engages both institutional and individual responsibility for this phenomena, and the methodological implications for a Man of Color conducting this type of research.

Brought to you by: the CALS Diversity & Inclusion Council and the Office for Diversity & Inclusive Excellence

 

Diverse Faculty Career Discussions: Strategies for Dealing with Microaggressions and Backlash in the Classroom

The Diverse Faculty Career Discussions are facilitated by Celeste González de Bustamante, Assistant Director of Faculty Initiatives in ODIEX and Associate Professor in the School of Journalism and Center for Latin American Studies

Co-facilitated by Nolan Cabrera, Associate Professor in Educational Policy Studies and Practice

We will discuss strategies and tips on how to address and deal with being a target of students’ racism, sexism, homophobia, etc. Attendees will have the opportunity to share their experiences and strategies. Bring your own brown bag lunch if you’d like. Beverages and snacks will be provided. 

RSVP is required, click here to RSVP

 

Mitigating Unconscious Bias Workshop: What Faculty, Staff, and Postdocs Can Do to Empower Themselves and Graduate Students

Graduate Center and the Office of Diversity and Inclusive Excellence are pleased to announce an upcoming workshop, ‘Mitigating Unconscious Bias: What Faculty, Staff, and Postdocs Can Do to Empower Themselves and Graduate Students.’

The workshop is free of charge. Lunch is provided, and space is limited to 40 in-person participants. We will also have an online option for people to attend through Zoom.

Please register online at: http://bit.ly/oct9unconsciousbias

Unconscious bias is not intentionally malicious, but it can certainly get in the way of our best efforts to promote and leverage the benefits of diversity as well as the impact of the work we do. Knowing how to mitigate unconscious bias and empower those who work for you is important to creating a successful environment, whether it be the classroom, lab, or office. This workshop will examine how unconscious bias can influence the workplace and classroom. The emphasis will be on how faculty, staff, and postdocs can mitigate the impact of unconscious bias and proactively empower students to do the same. We will share research-based strategies for addressing unconscious biases and micro-aggressions, and we will explore strategies that reduce the impact of our own unconscious biases.

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Professional Empowerment Workshop Series: Effective Mentoring

The second event of the Professional Empowerment Workshop Series

The goal of the series is to provide targeted professional development opportunities for career track faculty, appointed professionals, and staff with an emphasis on topics which are particularly relevant to underrepresented groups.

Participants will learn some of the curriculum from NRMN in creating a more skilled and effective mentoring relationship. You will be provided with a toolbox of strategies to use in creating effective mentoring relationships with your mentors and mentees including learning about your Communication Styles, establishing a Mentoring Agreement and creating an Initialized Academic Plan. Participants will gain knowledge and skills to:Identify roles mentors and mentees play in the overall professional development and effectiveness of their mentoring relationship, how to accommodate styles that differ from their own which enhances the diversity and vibrancy of their environments and community, develop strategies for guiding professional development, initiate and sustain periodic mentoring conversations, increase understanding of equity and inclusion and their influence on mentor-mentee interactions. 

Lydia Kennedy, Director, University of Arizona Health Sciences Office of Diversity and Inclusion, is also a certified facilitator with The National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) from UW-Madison

Brought to you by the Office for Diversity & Inclusive Excellence, CALS Diversity & Inclusion Council, CALS Staff Council, CALS Appointed Professional Council, Native Faculty, and UAHS Office of Diversity & Inclusion

Perspectives on Diversity & Inclusion Speaker Series: Men’s Role in Confronting Everyday Gender-Based Violence- Michael Brasher

Recent cultural movements highlight the scandal of everyday gender-based violence, calling into question assumptions about progress, violence, and gender in the United States. While it’s clear that male-identified folks have a role in creating change, questions of strategy and significance remain. This workshop will focus on cultivating awareness of everyday types of gender-based violence, with the goals of, first, exposing normalized behaviors and dynamics, and, second, thinking critically about meaningful approaches to prevention. Ultimately, we will examine and formulate together the question: “What is men’s role in confronting everyday forms of gender-based violence?” Michael Brasher (School of Geography and Development) will facilitate this conversation based on his current research and work doing anti-violence organizing in Tucson.

Brought to you by: the CALS Diversity & Inclusion Council and the Office for Diversity & Inclusive Excellence

Professional Empowerment Workshop Series: Public Speaking Tips: How to Tell Your Story with Style

The third event of the Professional Empowerment Workshop Series: Public Speaking Tips: How to Tell Your Story with Style!

The goal of the series is to provide targeted professional development opportunities for career track faculty, appointed professionals, and staff with an emphasis on topics which are particularly relevant to underrepresented groups.

We’ll break the ice with some public speaking games and hear a personal story. Afterwards, we’ll deconstruct how our speaker wrote the story and prepared to share it. Participants will be given writing prompts to draft their own personal stories. We’ll review general public speaking tips and Toastmaster style critiques (including recommendations for body language, eye contact and speech organization). After some de-stress warm ups for public speaking participants will be given an opportunity to share their story with the group. Finally, we’ll share information about joining UA Toastmasters.

Facilitated by Courtney Coffey, Ph.D., Coordinator, Grants & Contracts

Brought to you by the Office for Diversity & Inclusive Excellence, CALS Diversity & Inclusion Council, CALS Staff Council, CALS Appointed Professional Council, Native Faculty, and Office of Diversity and Inclusion at UAHS

Diverse Faculty Career Discussions: Negotiating and Framing Service

The Diverse Faculty Career Discussions are facilitated by Celeste González de Bustamante, Assistant Director of Faculty Initiatives in ODIEX and Associate Professor in the School of Journalism and Center for Latin American Studies

 Faculty of color and women often perform more service, which may hinder career advancement. This discussion aims to help faculty determine which kinds of service are most valued or important as they seek tenure and promotion, how to characterize service opportunities as in line with research and teaching goals in your candidate statement, and when and how to say “no” to service opportunities. We will also consider how to be nominated for higher status committees. 

RSVP is requiredclick here to RSVP. 

Perspectives on Diversity & Inclusion Speaker Series: Exploring Diversity in LGBQIA and Trans Identities – Martie van der Voort

Martie will present terminology, current trends, minority oppression, areas of concern, questions and answers, and generally how to be more inclusive and allied with this fabulous community.

We will provide LUNCH for this event! It's first-come, first-served, so make sure you show up early!

Plan on attending virtually?  Register for the Zoom Webinar for all 4 Speakers during Fall 2018: https://tinyurl.com/fall2018perspectives

Brought to you by: the CALS Diversity & Inclusion Council and the Office for Diversity & Inclusive Excellence