Developing Job Operation Sheets

                                    The Department of Agricultural Education  
                                                    The University of Arizona

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CAN YOU FOLLOW DIRECTIONS?

This is a timed test. You will have three (3) minutes.
Do not begin until you have read all questions.

1. You are not to share your answers with anyone. 
2. Read all statements before you do anything.
3. Print your name in the upper right hand corner. 
4. Circle the word you in sentence two.
5. Draw five (5) small squares in the upper left hand corner 
6. Put an x in each square.
7. Put a circle around each square.
8. Sign your name under the title of this test. 
9. After the title write yes three times.
10. Put a circle completely around sentence number 7 
11. Put an x in the lower left hand corner of this page. 
12. On the back of the paper multiply 103 by 66.
13. On the reverse side of this paper add 8950 and 9805.
4. Draw a rectangle around the word FIVE in sentence five. 
15. If you have followed directions so far, write "yes" in the bottom right corner.
16. Put a circle around your answer in number 13. 
17. Silently count from 10 to 1 backwards. 
18. Underline all even numbered questions.
19. Call out, "I'm on sentence 19 and have followed directions." 
20. Now that you have finished reading everything carefully, answer only questions one, two, and three.

 

 

FLOWCHART FOR DEVELOPMENT OF 
JOB OPERATION SHEET

RULES TO FOLLOW IN DEVELOPING JOB OPERATION SHEETS

  1. Analyze each of the units of instruction and list the jobs which are essential to provide the student with the experiences which will satisfy the performance objectives for the unit.
  2. Perform each of the jobs and keep a record of the operations, steps of procedure and key points which best describe the sequence of events to accomplish each job. List the tools and materials needed and specific references applicable to the job.
  3. Develop a rough draft of the job operation sheet following the format illustrated. Be as brief as possible but complete enough for clear understanding by a beginner.
  4. Analyze the operations for their completeness of steps of procedure.
  5. Use illustrations/drawings freely if they will contribute to a clear understanding or more instant recall of the teacher's demonstration.
  6. Repeat the job following the first draft of the job operation sheet and evaluate the operations and steps of procedure within such operation for sequence and completeness.
  7. Finalize the revised job operation sheet for duplication in quantities for student use.

 

JOB OPERATION SHEETS ARE NOT INTENDED FOR:

  1. Skills that are so simple that they will be readily remembered from a demonstration such as tying a square knot and soldering a seam.
  2. Jobs that are predominantly managerial, such as selecting welding electrodes. (Managerial jobs should be solved through analysis, study and discussion)
  3. Jobs that are predominately information, such as the theory of soldering and welding.
  4. Construction and repair projects, such as building feeders, repairing plows, etc. (For these jobs, a form such as a "Guide for Planning Projects in Mechanics" should be used.)

RULES TO FOLLOW IN USING JOB OPERATION SHEETS

  1. A Job operation sheet should be used as a supplementary teaching device after other appropriate teaching procedures have been used. These may include demonstrations, supervised study, discussion, group analysis of the problems, etc.
  2. The demonstration is a "moving picture" of the action to be followed. Job operation sheets can be best used to recall steps that should be followed in definite order and to recall key points that may make or break the job, or present a hazard
  3. The job operation sheet is not a substitute for teacher supervision of individual students. Time saved by the teacher through use of job operation sheets should be devoted to more adequate supervision and evaluation of skill practices and in helping students plan, construct and evaluate projects.
  4. Job operations sheets should be duplicated to become a part of a studentís notebook or laboratory record card.

LESSON: JOB OPERATION SHEETS

 OBJECTIVES

1. TO IDENTIFY THE CONCEPT AND PURPOSE OF JOB OPERATION SHEETS AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL TOOL.

2. TO IDENTIFY THE ADVANTAGES OF USING JOB OPERATION SHEETS.

3. TO ANALYZE A GIVEN JOB FOR OPERATIONS, PROCEDURE, AND -KEY POINTS.

4. TO LIST THE STEPS REQUIRED TO DEVELOP JOB OPERATION SHEETS.

5. TO DEVELOP JOB OPERATION SHEETS WITH ALL COMPONENTS FOR ALL APPROPRIATE ASSIGNED UNITS.

 

JOB OPERATION SHEET

AREA:

UNIT:

JOB:

OBJECTIVES:

TOOLS                                 MATERIALS                             REFERENCE

 

Steps of                        Procedure   

Key Points                   

Illustrations/
Reference          

     
     
     
     
     

Evaluating

   

Points

Criteria               

Possible Points

Student             

Teacher     

       
       
       
       
       
       

 

UNIT: Advanced Welding

JOB OPERATION NO. 2óRunning an Aluminum Weld Bead 
                                        with Rod Using TIG Process

A. Objectives:

1. When provided with the necessary tools and equipment the student will set up, prepare the weld metal and make a weld bead with rod on aluminum sheet following standard safe operating procedures.

2. Each student will complete one sample weld specimen of two weld beads using the TIG process with maximum of 30 minutes practice time and earn a minimum score of 75 points.

B. Introduction:

The most desirable process for fabricating aluminum parts by welding is with Tungston Inert Gas process. The skill of making a satisfactory weld bead with this equipment is basic to making high quality butt and fillet welds

Tools

Materials

Reference

TIG welding machine
Welding gloves
Welding helmet,  No 10 lens
Ceramic cup, assorted sizes
Stainless Steel Brush
1/16"x2"x4" al. strip
1/16"AWS5356 al filler rod
Argon gas 
 

Chap. 20, 
Arc Welding Lessons
TIG data chart

 

 

Steps of Procedure

Key Points

Illustrations/
References

A. Preparing the Metal

1.  Clean the aluminum sheet

2. Remove surface oxide from area of weld
 
a. Degrease-use waste cloth and solvent
a.  Use stainless steel brush

 

 

B. Preparing the Equipment

3. Set the current selector switch
4. Set the Hi-Freq switch
5. Open main valve on inert gas
bottle fully 
6. Connect the ground clamp to work
7. Attach power supply cable to source 
8. Turn welder power switch on
9. Adjust Argon gas flow, cfh.
a. Set to "AC"
a. Set to "Switch"
a. Open slowly
b. Double seated valve

 a. Use 230 volt/single phase

a. turn on torch switch
b. Turn flowmeter valve
c. Read top of ball
 

C. PREPARING THE TORCH ELECTRODE

10. grind end of new electrode to taper
11. Install "cup" and "collet" of proper size
12. Secure electrode in torch head extending ľ" from end of cup
 a. make length 5 times diameter
 a. Use TIG data chart

 a. Tighten collet retainer  snuggly

 

D. FORMING THE BALL

13. Set machine amperage 
14. Position electrode over copper block with ľ" arc length
15. Hold torch in hand like a pencil
16. Lower helmet over eyes
17. Press torch switch to strike arc
18. Release torch switch when ball is formed
 a. Use 70 amps AC
a. Hold torch in gloved  hand
a. Have index finger on switch
 b. Hold vertical

a. Make ball ĺ dia. of electrode

 

E. FORMING THE PUDDLE

19. Re-adjust electrode in collet
20. Strike arc on work piece
21. Establish "working" angle of torch
22. Hold approximately 1/8" arc length
23. Preheat starting point 
24. Watch for a bright clear puddle to form
 a. Position ball 1/8" beyond end of cup
a. Donít touch electrode to work piece
 a. Tip 75 degree angle to piece

a. Move torch in very tight circles over starting point

 

F. FEEDING THE ROD

25. Hold rod between third and fourth finger
26. Position rod 15 degree angle to work piece and to leading edge of puddle
27. Add rod by touching molten puddle
28. Remove rod and bring arc back to leading edge of puddle
29. Feed rod with thumb and forefinger 
a. Use glove on hand
 a. At the same time move  arc to rear puddle

a. Avoid touching the electrode

 

G. FORMING THE BEAD

30. Alternately feed rod into leading edge of puddle
31. Form distinct ripples by alternate dipping rod and advancing arc
32. Check continually for proper progress of bead
a. Keep bead 3/16" in width
a. Puddle bright and fluid
b. Puddle correct width
c. No bailing up of rod
 
     

 

The Operational Lesson Plan:

There are many important agricultural practices and skills where the value for students is essentially manipulative or manual skill (psychomotor) development. Whenever this ability and "know how" is necessary in order for the students to be able to do or perform the proactive and/or skill according to standard specifications, these lessons should be taught from an operational point of view. The students should learn to do these "jobs" efficiently, and the teacher's objectives for this lesson plan are (1) to develop the ability to do the job correctly, and (2) to develop the ability to perform a skill or practice satisfactorily.

Developing questions for study, making reading assignments, using class discussions or recitations based upon assigned study are costly, time-consuming, and inefficient for his type of teaching. Furthermore, lecturing on material of this nature is even worse. "One learns to do by doing" applies in teaching operational lessons. Too much time is wasted in trying to teach operational jobs by talking about them. Students should be shown how to do such skills and then be given ample practice time to learn how to do them.

The most important teacher preparation for operational lesson plans is to make a complete "step by step" analyses which outlines an up-to-date, economical and efficient way for doing the job or performing the skill. These "Job Operation Sheets" should then be followed by the teacher when giving the demonstration.

When conducting demonstrations, the following steps are suggested: 

Step 1. Teacher does and tells 
Step 2. Student does-teacher tells -OR -teacher does-students tells -OR -students does and tells 
Step 3. Students do under supervision

A suggested format for developing operational lesson plans is shown following:

Operational Lessons

FORMAT OF A LESSON PLAN FOR AN OPERATIONAL LESSON 

Area:

Unit:

Lesson: (Number and title)

COMPETENCY(IES) TO BE TAUGHT:

Need: 

List the important reasons lesson is taught.

LESSON OBJECTIVES:

1. Development of skill to do a job or perform a task satisfactorily according to standard specifications.

INTRODUCTION:

1. Why is the lesson to be taught?
2. Bring out the importance of skill/job/exercise. 
3. Show examples of use of the skill/job/exercise.

PROCEDURE:

1. Demonstration:

a. Teacher demonstrates how to perform skill as outlined on the job operation sheet.
b. Teacher explains clearly each step or operation and gives reasons why.
c. Student should demonstrate how to perform skill while explaining each step.

2. Supervised Practice:

a. Students practice skill under supervision of teacher. 
b. Teacher assists students.

3. Summary:

a. Review lesson based upon objectives.
b. Summarize the steps involved and review safety when appropriate.
c. Involve students in developing a concenses statement which concludes the lesson and identifies ways to use the skill.
d. When appropriate, write the conclusion on the board/overhead.

4. Application:

a. As students complete skill or practice, assign a production job or exercise to be completed according to specifications.

5. Evaluation:

a. Teacher includes psychomotor development activities on unit examinations. 
b. Teacher scores the quality of work of the job or exercise performed by student according to specifications.

REALIA :

List specific references, instructional materials, job operation sheets, tools and equipment to be used in teaching the lesson. 

SCIENCES/MATH CONCEPTS REINFORCED:

List specific concepts contained in the lesson.

 

 

 

Questions or problems regarding this web site should be directed to billye@ag.arizona.edu. Copyright © 2000 Department of Agricultural Education. All rights reserved.
Tuesday, 23 August 2005

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at the University of Arizona