Industrial Crops

Extension Faculty

Assistant specialist & asst. professor - School of Plant Sciences
Marley 341D / (520) 626-6287 / epp@email.arizona.edu
Extension Weed Specialist - School of Plant Sciences
541B Marley / 520-621-7613 / wmcclosk@cals.arizona.edu

Evaluation of management tactics for weedy and invasive plant species in Arizona's crops, range and natural landscapes including cultural methods, herbicides, GPS-RTK precision cultivation, optical sensing and computer technology.

Crop Related, Non-Extension Research

Associate Professor - School of Plant Sciences
821C Marley / 520-626-8215 / baltrus@email.arizona.edu
520-626-6573 (Lab)

The Baltrus lab is interested in understanding microbial evolution with a focus on the mechanisms and costs of adaptation and guided by expectations from genomics and population genetics.

Associate Professor - School of Plant Sciences
Marley 441C / (520) 626-1562 / mbeilstein@email.arizona.edu
(520) 626-1563 (Lab)

The focus of my lab is functional evolution in the plant family Brassicaceae. Currently my group is working to understand how the enzyme telomerase evolved. In addition we are interested in the processes by which long non-coding RNAs emerge and gain...

Professor - School of Plant Sciences
Marley 341G / 520-626-5312 / bmpryor@u.arizona.edu
520-626-2781 (Lab)

Dr. Pryor's research interests include biological and cultural control of disease in field, tree, and vegetable crops, phylogenetic analysis and species concepts in fungi, secondary fungal metabolites, and environmental mycology. Additional...

University Distinguished Professor - School of Plant Sciences
Forbes 415 / 520-621-7612 / dtray@email.arizona.edu
520-621-2817 (Lab)

Research emphasizes evaluation and enhancement of new and/or underutilized plant germplasm suitable for cultivation in arid environments. Present focus is the evaluation and development of new biofuel feedstocks.

Associate Professor - School of Plant Sciences
Marley 541E / 520-621-3970 / jessewoodson@email.arizona.edu

Plants use their energy-producing organelles (i.e. chloroplasts and mitochondria) to sense and adapt to changing environments and stresses. Our goal is to understand the mechanisms behind these signaling networks, allowing us to control crop growth.